The Cathedral - Devotional Images

The images of Our Lady and St. Joseph holding the child Jesus located in the Holy Family shrine (the west transept) are original to the church.

Above and to the right of the Holy Family shrine is a statue of St. Francis of Assisi (1226). St. Francis is the patron of Catholic action and the patron of pet owners. The life of St. Francis challenges every Christian to embrace the gospel commands to live simply and justly.

Above and to the left of the Holy Family shrine is a statue of St. John Bosco (1888), patron of Catholic youth and editors and founder of the Society of St. Francis de Sales, the Salesians. He is remembered for his work with neglected boys.

Above and to the right of the Holy Angels shrine is a statue of St. Theresa of Lisieux, the Little Flower (1897). St. Theresa is patron of florists and foreign missionaries. Although she never left the convent in her short lifetime, her prayers for the missions did go forth.

Above and to the left of the shrine is a statue of St. Patrick the “Apostle of Ireland.” Many of the founding members of the parish were of Irish descent.

A depiction of Our Lord Jesus of the Sacred Heart stands to the left of the presbytery on the north wall. Devotion to our Lord in this form rose in popularity in the late 18th century.

St. Anthony (1231) is presented to the right of presbytery on the north wall. St. Anthony is the patron of the poor and oppressed.

To the right of the statue of St. Anthony under the eastern arch is an acrylic painting of Blessed Juan Diego displaying on his tilma (cape) the holy image of Our Lady of Guadalupe who is Patroness of the Americas and who holds special significance for Mexicans.

A textile image of St. John the Baptist is to the right of the statue of St. Anthony. St. John the Baptist is a popular saint among many Latin peoples, especially those of Puerto Rican descent. His feast is universally celebrated on June 24.

St. Martin de Porres (1639) stands at the south end of the Cathedral Annex hallway. St. Martin is patron of inter-racial justice. His life invites Christians to actively care for others no matter their color or race.

In the west and east transept under the first, third, twelfth and fourteenth stations of the Stations of the Cross are the four ancient depictions of the gospel writers.

St. Matthew appears as an image of a winged man because the gospel narrative attributed to him traces Jesus' human genealogy. St. Mark is depicted as a winged lion because the gospel narrative attributed to him begins with the words “a herald's voice in the desert crying out; make ready the way of the Lord.” (1:3) The words suggest the roar of a lion. St. Luke is seen as a winged ox reminiscent of the ox as an animal of sacrifice under the old law. The gospel narrative attributed to Luke stresses the atoning sacrifice of Jesus. St. John is depicted as an eagle because the gospel that bears his name rises to such lofty heights in presenting the mind of Jesus.